Saturday, October 04, 2008

Back from hiatus - Utah politics as usual

Geez, you go on hiatus for a few months, and all heck breaks out in local politics. Where to start...

  • Former TV news anchor Phil Riesen (D-Salt Lake) leaks a story to TV news that Greg Hughes (R-Draper) told another representative that, wink wink, if she would vote for vouchers, she might, you know, notice a few extra OOOs in her campaign account. The unusual part: Riesen leaked it to KSL, rather than his former employer KTVX.
  • Hughes gets into a "So's your mother" with the House speaker's chief of staff, and is escorted out of a parking lot by the Highway Patrol. He also hires an attorney to defend the ethics complaint and maybe sue Riesen, KSL, and anyone who watched the news or thought about it. Re-elect Greg Hughes: He's job security for law enforcement (and ethics investigators, and attorneys...).
  • Earlier, Hughes (is this guy hogging all the ink or what?) suggested that Voices for Utah Children, Roz McGee's old organization and now Karen Crompton's, had endorsed him. Turns out that the letter he was quoting had been sent to every legislator who voted for a certain bill. But maybe Crompton sealed his with a kiss...
  • Utah Democrats launched an irritating push poll that basically asked, "Would you rather vote for Republican X, who kicks puppies, or Democrat Y, who thinks you're cute?" Well, since you put it so objectively . . . .
  • Democrat Jay Seegmiller, who is giving Greg Curtis (R-Real Salt Lake) another run for his considerable money, was also victimized by push pollers, who suggested that Seegmiller wants government to pay for abortions performed by illegal immigrants. Too little too late: looks like Curtis's days might be numbered.

  • And last: Genealogists ruin everything! According to a security expert and KSL commenters, Ancestry.com and genealogists who post things on the interweb are promoting identity theft. Forget those letters we get monthly from our banks, investment brokers, hospitals, retailers, and internet providers telling us that they've, um, mislaid our personal data -- we were fine until Aunt Betty posted grandma's obituary.

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